NSPCC lottery: children’s charity gambles its reputation

3rd July 2014 by techadmin facebook 2 mins read Category: News

The National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children (NSPCC) has come up with a novel way of topping up its coffers – an internet lotto.

The leading UK children’s charity has been running an eLottery platform since May this year, offering punters the chance to win £1,000 in weekly draws and £8,000 in quarterly superdraws.

A win-win situation?

The NSPCC hopes that its lottery will help generate funds for its core services, including ChildLine – the UK’s free, confidential 24-hour helpline for abused youngsters.

NSPCC Head of Individual Giving, Amanda Mitchell-Francombe, said: “The Weekly Lottery is a great way for the NSPCC to attract a new audience of regular givers, whilst offering the chance to win prizes.

“Every weekly entry is another £1 towards our vital work ensuring children across the UK are protected from harm. Players will be helping children every week of the year as well as having the chance to win some amazing prizes – a win-win situation.”

This is not the first time the NSPCC has dabbled in gambling.

In March, a charity event was held at Cheltenham (sponsored by William Hill), in which celebrity punters (including darts champion Phil Taylor and football bruiser Harry Redknapp) collaborated with expert tipsters to raise £50,000.

However, marketing director at Castle Casino, Samuel Miranda, was critical of these ventures:

“[The lottery is] a fundamental contradiction: you've got an organisation that looks after and protects children from harm advertising a gambling product strictly for adults. It's like Alcoholics Anonymous running a pub crawl.”

Gambling for a good cause

RightCasino.com contacted the NSPCC to ask whether they felt there was any contradiction in a children’s charity raising funds with an adults-only product.

NSPCC Director of Fundraising, Paul Farthing, said: “The NSPCC is supported by hundreds of thousands of adults and children. We rely on voluntary donations for over 90% of our income and so we are continually exploring new ways of fundraising to help us protect more vulnerable children and young people.”

“For every £1 raised [with the weekly lottery], 78.9p is spent delivering our vital services such as ChildLine and our helpline providing advice and support to adults with concerns about a child’s welfare.”

“The NSPCC’s Weekly Lottery is licensed and regulated by the Gambling Commission under the Gambling Act 2005, ensuring that it is only open to over 16s. We are committed to ensuring that Weekly Lottery players gamble responsibly, and our website includes contact details for Gamble Aware as well as a link to our responsible gaming guide.”

Tickets can be purchased from the NSPCC lottery website for £1.

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